Thursday, January 10, 2008

Today's Saints

ST. William of Bourges
Also known as
Guillaume de Bourges; William Berruyer; William de Don Jeon; William the Confessor
Memorial
10 January
Profile
Member of the family of the Counts of Nevers, his father Baldwin planned a military life for William. Educated by his maternal uncle Peter the Hermit, archdeacon of Soissons. Drawn to religious life from an early age. Priest; canon of Soissons, and canon of Paris. Monk in the Order of Grandmont, noted for his austerities, his devotion to the Blessed Sacrament, and for the time spent praying at the altar. Internal dissession in the Order caused him to leave Grandmont for the recently formed Cistercians, taking the habit at Pontigny. Abbot at Fontaine-Jean in Sens, France. Abbot at Chaalis near Senlis, France in 1187.

Reluctant archbishop of Bourges in 1200, accepting the position only after receiving orders from the general of his order, and from Pope Innocent III. Lived an even more austere life, defended clerical rights against the state, cared personally for the poor, sick, imprisoned and debauched, and converted many Albigensians in his diocese to orthodox Christianity. Witnesses claim he performed 18 miracles during his life, and another 18 after his death.
Born
12th century in Nevers, France
Died
10 January 1209 at Bourges, France of natural causes while in prayer
Canonized
17 May 1217 by Pope Honorius III
William de Don Jeon was born at Nevers France. He was educated by his uncle Peter, archdeacon of Soissons, became a canon of Soissons and of Paris and then became a monk at Grandmont Abbey. He became a Cistercian at Pontigny, served as Abbot at Fontaine-Jean in Sens, and in 1187 became Abbot at Chalis near Senlis. He was named Archbishop of Bourges in 1200, accepted on the order of Pope Innocent III and his Cistercian superior, lived a life of great austerity, was in great demand as a confessor, aided the poor of his See, defended ecclesiastical rights against seculars, even the king, and converted many Albigensians during his missions to them. He died at Bourges on January 10, and was canonized in 1218 by Pope Honorius III. His feast day is January 10th

ST. THOMIAN of Armagh

Also known as
Thomas; Thomas of Armagh; Thomian; Toiman; Toiman of Armagh; Toimen; Toimen of Armagh
Memorial
10 January
Profile
Archbishop of Armagh, Ireland, from c.623. Involved in the controversy over the proper date for celebrating Easter.
Died
c.660
Canonized
Pre-Congregation

Feastday: January 10
660

Sometimes called Toiman, Archbishop of Armagh, Ireland, from about 623. He is remembered for a letter he composed to the Holy See concerning the paschal controversy, namely the date to be followed for the celebrating of Easter.


ST. SAETHRYTH

Also known as
Sethrida
Memorial
10 January
Profile
Step-daughter of the king of the Angles. Half-sister of Saint Ethelburga and Saint Ethelfreda. Benedictine nun in a convent in Gaul. Abbess.
Died
660 of natural causes
Canonized
Pre-Congregation

Feastday: January 10
660

Benedictine abbess, also called Sethrida. The stepdaughter of a local king of the Angles, she entered a convent in Gaul (modem France) eventually becoming abbess. Sts. Ethelburga and Ethelfreda were half-sisters.

ST. DERMOT

Also known as
Diarmis; Diarmaid the Just
Memorial
10 January
Profile
Abbot. Founder of a monastery on Innis-Closran, Ireland. Noted teacher, writer, and preacher. Spiritual director of Saint Kiernan of Clonracnois. Built seven churches on Quaker Island.
Died
542 of natural causes
Canonized
Pre-Congregation

Feastday: January 10
6th century

Abbot and founder of a monastery on Innis-Closran Island, Ireland. He is listed also as Diarmis or Diarmaid. Dermot trained St. Kiernan of Clonrnacnois.


ST. JOHN CAMILLUS the Good
Also known as
John Camillus; John the Good; John Bonus
Memorial
10 January
Profile
Bishop of Milan, Italy, the first to live in the city for 80 years, his predecessors being in exile due to Arian Lombard invasion. Fought Arianism and Monothelitism.
Died
c.660 of natural causes
Name Meaning
God is gracious; gift of God (John)

Feastday: January 10
660

Bishop of Milan. The Lombard invasion had left Milan a vacant see, and John was chosen to fill the position. He was a relentless enemy of the heresies of his era and was called “the Good” for conspicuous holiness.


St. MARCIAN of Constantinople

Memorial
10 January
Profile
Member of a Roman family of Constantinople. Related to Emperor Theodosius II. Ordained in 455. He lived such an austere life that he was wrongly accused of the heresy of Novatianism. Treasurer of the great church Hagia Sophia. Appointed Oikonomos, a position second only to the patriarch in authority. Gave away huge sums from his family fortune, but always anonymously so as not to draw attention to himself. Restored several churches. Composed several hymns, and was known as a miracle worker.

One day as he rushed to the consecration of a new church, he encountered a miserable, nearly naked beggar on the street. Marcian gave the man all his clothing, keeping only his chasuble. When he arrived at the church, however, he appeared to be wearing a golden robe under the chasuble; Patriarch Gennadius even rebuked Marcian for dressing so richly. The saint then pulled off the chasuble to show he was naked.
Died
c.480
Canonized
Pre-Congregation

Feastday: January 10

Confessor and hymnist of Constantinople. He was a member of a Roman family of Constantinople, related to Emperor Theodosius II. Ordained in 455, he was so ascetical that he was wrongly accused of Novatianism. Marcian was the treasurer of Hagia Sophia, was appointed Oikonomos - second only to the patriarch and restored several churches. He is also believed to have composed hymns and was a famous miracle worker.

ST. NICANOR
Memorial
10 January
Profile
Chosen by the Apostles as deacon and minister of charities in Jerusalem.
Died
martyred
Canonized
Pre-Congregation

Feastday: January 10

Early martyr and one of the seven deacons of Jerusalem. A resident of Jerusalem, he was chosen by the Apostles to minister to the needs of those requiring assistance in the Holy City. According to tradition, he went to Cyprus where he was put to death during the reign of Emperor Vespasian, although this is now believed unlikely.


St. Peter Orseolo
Also known as
Peter Urseolus
Memorial
10 January
Profile
Born to a wealthy, noble, and prominent family. Married at age 18 to Felicitas, and the father of one son, Peter, who became the Doge of Venice in 991. Admiral and commander of the Venetian fleet by age 20. Rid the Adriatic Sea of pirates.

Chosen Doge of Venice on 12 August 976, the day after a revolt, the murder of his predecessor, and a fire that destroyed much of the city. Built hospitals and orphanages, started reconstruction of the Cathedral of Saint Mark, and began social programs to help widows, orphans, pilgrims, and the abandoned. He poured much of his own fortune into the effort, and within two years Peter had restored law and order, and rebuilt much of the city. Rightly considered one of Venice's greatest rulers.

In the night of 1 September 978, believing his duty to the world fulfilled, and possibly feeling crushed by it all, Peter secretly left Venice for the Benedictine monastery of Cuxa in the Pyrenees on the border of France and Spain, not even telling his family of his plans. Benedictine monk. While the move was sudden, it was apparently something he'd been considering for over a decade. When his wife learned of his move, she approved; they'd lived chastely since the birth of their son, and she knew of his spiritual yearnings. Spiritual student of Saint Romuald at Cuxa at whose suggestion he built a hermitage, and retired even further from the world, spending the rest of his life in solitude and prayer.
Born
928 at Rivo alto, Province of Udina, Venice
Died
10 January 987 at Cuxa of natural causes; his tomb became a site for pilgimages and miracles
Canonized
recognized in 1027 by the bishop of Elne; cultus confirmed by Pope Clement XII in 1731

Feastday: January 10
928-987



Benedictine hermit. Also called Peter Orseolo, he was a member of one of the most noble houses of Venice and, at the age of twenty, became an admiral in the Venetian Navy. After a series of successful campaigns against the Dalmatian pirates, he was elected Doge of Venice in 967, supposedly securing his elevation by poisoning his predecessor Peter Candiani IV, as was charged by St. Peter Damian. For two years Peter ruled with consummate skill, assisting Venice to weather a series of political crises. Then, without any warning and without informing his family, he disappeared from Venice and secretly entered the Benedictine abbey of Cuxa, in the Spanish Pyrenees. There he devoted himself to a life of severe austerity and asceticism, working as a humble sacrist until St. Romuald suggested that he become a hermit. He lived alone until his death.


St. PETRONIUS

Memorial
10 January
Profile
Son of a Roman senator from the area around modern Avignon, France. Monk at Lerins. Bishop of Die c.456.
Died
463 of natural causes
Canonized
Pre-Congregation

Feastday: January 10
463


Monk and bishop. Petronius was the son of a Roman senator from the area of modern Avignon who became a monk at Lerins. He later became bishop of Die about 456.

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